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Rediscovering Ginninderra:
Mary Cavanagh

Born: 1841; Died: 1921; Married: Patrick Cavanagh

Mary  Cavanagh

The Cavanaghs became synonymous with the Mulligans Flat area, even though they first selected land at One Tree Hill.

Mary was the daughter of Irish immigrants, Brian and Margaret Logue (nee McAlroy; post Margaret Crinigan). She was born 'at sea', during the voyage out to New South Wales and her birth was registered at Parramatta on arrival in 1841.

Samuel Schumack wrote – "When he arrived in Duntroon in 1856 Brian Logue and his family had charge of the dairy. He had six daughters and one son, and the dairy was a model of cleanliness and efficiency. Early in 1857 the Logue family left the dairy and took a farm at Canberra.
Patrick Cavanagh married one of Brian Logue's daughters and both were highly esteemed.
In later years I had good neighbours around me, but none better than this grand couple".

Sixteen-year-old Mary married Patrick Cavanagh at Queanbeyan in 1857. In the late 1850s, Mary was working as a domestic servant for Reverend Smith at his parsonage in Canberra, while Patrick was a farm labourer throughout the district. They were to have a bountiful marriage with twelve children, although one died in infancy.

After the land reforms of 1861, her father-in-law, Thomas Cavanagh, selected a small plot at One Tree Hill and the Cavanaghs slowly built up this holding into a prosperous farm - "Fairview".

After some time, Patrick and Mary established their own farm at "Eastview", Mulligans Flat.

Mary acted as midwife around the district and delivered most of her grandchildren at Strayleaf.

Their children Michael and wife Ethel, Jane and Aaron/Ernie farmed "Eastview" with their parents, whilst Clarence farmed at "Strayleaf" over the road. The other children left the district.

Patrick died in 1914 and Mary followed him seven years later in 1921.

Grand-son Ernest had moved down from Queensland at a young age and grew up on "Eastview". After marrying Beatrice Smith, he took over "Eastview" when Michael died childless in 1937.

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